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Friday, November 28, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 232, even more Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

28 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 232, even more Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: while on assignment in Gdansk, Poland, an agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The point about the climax for the new novel that I'm writing, is that I didn't know exactly where the novel would go when I started writing.  In many (if not most) of my novels, especially the early ones, I knew exactly where I was going--I just wasn't certain how I would get there.  In writing my latest novels, I started with a great idea, but I wasn't completely certain where I was going to go with it.  I don't entirely recommend this method.  It has helped me define how to identify and write a climax.  By that, I mean, I've been evaluating how I get to the climax, and I've been sharing those ideas on my other blog.  What I should do is also share some of the information here. 

The real trick in writing a novel is to make everything come together in the climax--of course most people won't pick up your novel for the climax.  Most people pick up a novel because it is unique and exciting (or entertaining), and the initial scene (or at least the blurb on the cover) excites them.  When most people read a novel that is entertaining to them, the climax is really the let down point--it's the place where the author starts to say good bye.  The characters are revealed or they are almost fully revealed.  The climax tops off the characters and the novel and brings everything to a reasonable and hopefully exciting and fulfilling resolution.  The reader might not pick up the novel for the climax, but a poor climax will possibly prevent them from reading another one of your novels.

The main point of the climax is to resolve the theme and plot with entertainment and excitement.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 231, more Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

27 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 231, more Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: while on assignment in Gdansk, Poland, an agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

My latest novel is about a girl computer genius.  This isn't a simple novel, and it follows the general ideas of my other novels--so you know there will be a deity involved.  In fact, the protagonist is granted the position of a Japanese kami (god).  The character has a lot of issues, and as I noted, I'm working toward the climax in the novel.  I had an idea where the novel was going, but I didn't know exactly what the focus of the theme would be or what trials the characters would face.  My daughter thought I should include North American deities.  In fact, what I did was set the novel in Tacoma, Washington (Spanaway to be exact).  The Japanese deity was an immigrant to the USA--hey, it makes sense in the novel.  That's the thing about novels--what I describe in a single sentence, in a novel an entire conversation and narrative ensue. 

Since the novel is set in the USA, there is no reason not to include North American deities.  In fact, I choose to include some native people in the novel.  As I mentioned, this is a complex novel, and I'm thinking about making it be the first of a series set.  The focus of the first novel is the relationship of the protagonist (super genius computer girl) and a young man who saves her.  The novel begins with the saving, and the rising action builds on the understanding and development of both character's roles in the shrine and their work.  Their work is an interesting part of the novel.  A further complication is that the Japanese kami (deity) world is very concerned about this new kami.  This becomes a center piece for the climax.  One Japanese kami opposes the protagonist because she is gaining more acceptance and having a greater effect on people than he is--thus the climax.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 230, Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

26 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 230, Climax design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: while on assignment in Gdansk, Poland, an agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The theme determines the climax--so, the first step in writing a novel is to determine the theme.  This is what I advise, but this isn't what I always do.  If you read my other blogs, you know I am writing now about the current novel I'm writing.  I explained that I don't fully know the theme or the climax.  I'm sneaking up on the climax.  As long as the writing is cohesive and not extraneous, there is no reason why you can't write a novel this way.  I wouldn't recommend it on the first or even the fifth go.  Once you get a good feel for how to write a novel, a little freedom is okay.  When you are first starting, you'll find you need to trim a lot to get rid of the extra stuff.

I recommend starting with a theme and writing toward it.  This means the general form of the climax is known.  For example, in Valeska, you know she must become dependent and be redeemed.  Both of these are very open and indeterminate ideas.  For the dependent part, I determined she would be his companion and friend.  This is not a climax concept.  It was easy to write and lent itself well to the overall plot and storyline.  I made Valeska like the agent's sister--when woman becomes, George's love interest, Valeska isn't jealous, the other woman is.  The interaction between characters made the work very entertaining.

Redeemed, from the standpoint of climax, is the operative term.  The question then is, what is redeemed?  In our culture, the word and concept "redeemed" has many deep connotations.  I decided that redeemed would have a spiritual and social meaning.  The vampire Valeska was a person companionless.  She meets George who accepts her for who she is.  She meets, Leila and Scaith who also accept her for who she is.  Leila loves George and aids in Valeska's redemption.  This sounds easy--it wasn't.  The novel is all about trust and friendship with a hearty bit of detective work, fun, and mayhem added in.  I'll write about how I'm sneaking up on the climax of my latest novel.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 229, more design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

25 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 229, more design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: while on assignment in Gdansk, Poland, an agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

I've written about themes.  The themes of a novel defines the characters, the initial setting, the plot, and the climax.  If we look at the theme statement for Valeska: while on assignment in Gdansk, Poland, an agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.  Okay, I cheated and add the setting.  I originally forgot the setting in building the theme statement that I have had at the initial ramblings of this blog.  Like I wrote before, the theme statement should allow you to write your initial scene, set the characters, and begin the plot.  The theme statement should also contain the seeds (or the whole) of the climax.

Note for the revised theme statement for Valeska, I have enough information to begin to write.  The setting is Gdansk, Poland.  The initial scene should logically fall out of the protagonist and protagonist's helper or antagonist's meeting.  In this case, the primary characters are the protagonist and the protagonist's helper, therefore the novel should begin with their meeting--it does.  The two characters mentioned in the theme statement are the protagonist and the protagonist's helper.  One is a vampire and the other is an agent for the organization.  This gives enough information to begin to develop the characters.  Remember, the characters should be fully (or nearly fully) developed by the author before they are revealed in the writing. 

The plot is defined by the theme statement--it will be that the vampire girl becomes dependent on the agent.  This is what the author should build into the plot.  Finally, the climax is there if you look hard enough--the vampire girl is redeemed.  That is the plot resolution.  I know it is a bit broad, but the theme doesn't define the novel, the theme bounds the novel.  The writer has all the boundaries of the theme statement to write within.  How is the girl redeemed?  What does it mean to be redeemed?  These are the questions the author must answer.  All we know is that this is the point at which the author is aiming in the writing of the novel--in my opinion, this is more than sufficient.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Monday, November 24, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 228, design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

24 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 228, design Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Climax

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Then the point becomes how to design the plot, theme, and resolution (climax).  I transitioned (kind of) from the rising action to the climax.  I'm actually in the process of transitioning.  The rising action starts at the end of the initial scene and builds into the climax.  That means the author should (hopefully) have some idea what the climax is.  I will confess, that I have written whole novels by sneaking up on the climax.  That's not to say I didn't know where I was going, but rather that the rising action seemed to build itself to the climax. 

Let me go on the record to express that I don't like authors who write with no cohesive plan in their writing, but I will forgive those who let the story unfold in its own time and space.  I've written before that the theme will determine the climax, the trick is to find it through the plot.  I think this is absolutely true.  The theme must determine the climax of the novel and the plot should follow along.  The problem is to find the proper resolution of the theme (and in some cases to define fully the theme).  Themes are or should be very simple, but the complexities of a novel will affect and drive the theme outcome (resolution) in a way that might not be obvious until the author plans or writes the storyline.  This is not as unusual as it might seem.  Books don't write themselves, but the storyline isn't cut and dried at all.  When an author begins to write, he doesn't have any idea of the full gamut of complexities he is about to endue within the novel.  Those complexities come out and can only come out with the writing and sometimes editing of the novel.  The interconnections themselves are many times unpredictable.  For example, in my published Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox novels, I had an ornamental pin that was given to a character in one novel.  In the final edit of the third novel, I went back and added the pin into the narrative to connect the characters between the two books.  A tiny paragraph about a pin reaffirmed and connected the novels in a very special way.  Anyone reading both novels would immediately get the connection.  Within novels themselves, the author discovers these magical means of connecting the characters and events.  
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 227, methods Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

23 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 227, methods Plots, Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

How to make the plot, theme, and resolution similar or the same.  This is a cohesive novel.  Theoretically, the plot, theme, and climax (resolution) should all align.  In a very complex novel, if doesn't necessarily have to be at the same points, but they should still align.  I mentioned that you sill find some modern novels that don't have a similar plot, theme, and resolution.  An allegory doesn't necessarily have the same or a similar plot, theme, and resolution.  If you remember, Aksinya is a semi-allegory.  In an allegory, the theme and the plot should be different, however, they should align--that is, the theme and plot climax should be the same, they just represent different things.  In my semi-allegory, Aksinya, the plot and theme are the same--the allegory runs apace the plot while the theme is similar, but different.

I'm getting a little into the weeds, but it might be worth noting.  Aksinya is a semi-allegory based on TobitTobit, itself is considered by many to be an allegory in its own right.  In Tobit, the demon is beaten by an angel because of the faith and trustworthiness of Tobias and Sara.  In Aksinya, Aksinya calls a demon and contracts it.  She becomes an active Sara who pines for release and marriage.  Her Tobias is Father Dobrushin.  The dog is Natalya--sorry Natalya.  The theme is the release of Aksinya from the demon.  The plot is the release of Aksinya from the demon.  One must happen before the other.  Aksinya's problem is sin.  Luxuria and sorcery are her sin and her temptation.  She must overcome these before she can obtain release from the demon.  Thus, there is a theme climax and a plot climax in the novel, Aksinya.  Both are similar, but within the plot, they are different.  This is a complex alignment of the plot, theme, and climax, but I think you can see how it all fits together.  The point for your novel(s) is to make everything come together properly.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 226, more Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

22 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 226, more Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The basic novel is about character revelation.  I noted yesterday, the focus of the plot, theme, and resolution of a balanced novel are all about character revelation.  This is a very powerful method of writing a novel, but it isn't the only method of putting one together.  You can have a mystery novel with a resolution (climax) of a mystery that has a slightly different theme.  Usually the plot must match the resolution--it is possible to have a climax not be the climax of the plot, but that is never a good idea. 

An example of a novel where the plot, theme, and resolution might not match up is in a modern romance novel.  The plot of the novel might revolve around the protagonist and the protagonist's helper (or the antagonist), but "love" could be the theme and the plot be about something else entirely.  This isn't that uncommon in many romance movies (chick flicks).  The movie or novel is about a man (or woman) in conflict somehow (business dealings, school, the government)--that is the plot.  The theme is about the man and woman getting together and falling in love.  The plot resolution is about solving the business, school, government problem while the theme resolution is about the couple falling in love.  This split between the theme and plot resolution isn't as uncommon as you might imagine--just look for it. 

I'd recommend that in your novel writing you keep the plot, theme, and resolution similar.  Because I gave you the novel Valska, I'll mention it.  The plot and theme of Valeska are both very similar.  The plot is about overcoming a demon, while the theme is about overcoming internal demons.  Similar, but not the same.  There is a separate theme and plot resolution (climax), but both are similar in effect (not the events).  This is one method of brining the plot and theme together.  I'll look at more methods. 
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Friday, November 21, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 225, still Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

21 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 225, still Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

I am obviously not just making an observation about how to determine the genre of a novel.  The idea is to show how to develop storyline.  The power of the storyline comes out of a cohesive plot and theme.  There must always be revelation of the characters (primarily the protagonist)--that always results in a good novel, however, it isn't the only consideration of a novel. If you look at the parts of a novel, you will see the climax is the focus.  All good novels build to the climax and have a resolution.  The focus of the climax is usually the indicator of the revelation of the plot.  For example, if the climax resolves a mystery, the novel is likely a mystery plot.  If the climax resolves a love interest, the novel is likely a romance plot.  This isn't always true, but then there are a lot of odd novels out there and many better than others. 

In my estimation, a novel can be made very powerful by ensuring the resolution, the plot, and the theme match well.  That doesn't mean they have to be the same, but rather that a mystery novel should have a theme, plot, and resolution that match the concept of mystery. 

Let's evaluate this from the concept of the basic novel.  A basic novel is characterized by the revelation of the protagonist.  Oliver Twist  can stand in for this "basic" novel.  The entire novel is about the revelation of Oliver Twist.  Oliver doesn't know exactly who he is (that is, his origins).  His friends don't either.  He makes his way in the world and the author (Dickens) both tells and shows us the life of Oliver Twist.  The mystery (this isn't a mystery novel) is who is this person Oliver Twist.  Notice, the plot follows a character revelation idea.  The theme isn't quite as nice, but we ignore it--the theme is basically that a man holds the stature of his birth--Oliver was a noble birth and therefore a noble man.  He learns from his experience to act nobly to others even those of a lower lineage.  Still the theme is about the revelation of the character, Oliver Twist.  In this example, the plot, theme, and then the climax (resolution) are about the revelation of who Oliver Twist is.  In the end, the low born and criminal, Bill Sykes is defeated by the honest though soiled woman, who could spot Oliver's nobility.  This is the essence of a character revelation novel.  I'm certain you can think of many other examples--most early novels were put together like this.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 224, Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

20 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 224, Other Plots, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Each genre is defined by the revelation of the plot--revelation of the characters is the basic novel.  So, if in my plot, I reveal the love of the protagonist, that is a romance novel.  If in my plot, I reveal the future, that is a science fiction novel.  If in my plot, I reveal a military situation, that is a military novel.  Until we arrived at the military example, everything was cut and dried--the plot revelation determines the genre of the novel, not just the subject.  For example, currently, on television, military criminal programs are all the rage--are these military or mystery?  The easy answer is--yes.  They are in some measure mixed genre.  They are especially mixed genre when the revelation is dependent on a unique military event or situation--it is less clear if the situation is not uniquely military.

I've written a about this before, especially in science fiction.  Just because the setting is in the future, it isn't necessarily science fiction.  As you can see from the concept of the plot resolution, to be true science fiction, the plot must reveal the future--especially future science.  Just setting a story in the future doesn't necessarily make it science fiction.  Many modern novels are set in a future, but are not necessarily science fiction and are not considered science fiction.  An example of this are Ayn Rand's novels--they are not considered science fiction, but they assume some future time and include future technological elements.  Perhaps we need a new genre.

Another genre than gets mixed a lot is horror and romance.  Horror takes advantage of many different settings but if the revelation is the creation of fear or terror--it is horror.  Romance is a very general theme or subtheme.  Some Victorian novels could be argued were Victorian Romance plots.  Every adult (normal) novel should include love as a subtheme.  If love is the theme, it might be a romance plot revelation.  There's more.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 223, History Mystery Plot, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

19 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 223, History Mystery Plot, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Then came The Moon Stone.  Novels prior to The Moon Stone were all about character revelation.  The focus was on the people.  The mystery was the people.  Look at Oliver Twist or Jayne Eire.  The revelation and the revealed mystery was simply the people in the novel.  The authors had devised the concept of plot revelation, but in The Moon Stone, the revelation was an object and not necessarily the people.  Now, don't get me wrong, an important part of The Moon Stone was the revelation of the people, but this new type of novel brought into play a new idea--the idea of a mystery outside of human revelation. 

This is what mystery novels are--they are a revelation of an event or a thing rather than the revelation of a person.  All novels solve or resolve some kind of mystery, but a true mystery novel solves or resolves a problem based on a thing or an event (robbery, murder, secret, lost item).  The Moon Stone is considered the first "mystery" novel in English.  It would not be the last, by any means--the idea that an event or a thing could be revealed sparked the imagination of many writers and readers. 

Note, that there are other types of revelation or solutions.  The revelation of a character's life is the standard form a novel.  The revelation of an event or item is the standard form of a "mystery" novel.  We just defined two genre of writing.  There are other forms of revelation and each has its own genre.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 222, Mystery Plot, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

18 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 222, Mystery Plot, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Initially novels in English were written in a journalistic form.  They were in the first person, present tense, implying the past.  The point of the novel, at that time, was to convey a story in a long format.  The first novels in English were written by Daniel Defoe.  I hope you have read them all.  Novels changed rather quickly as the form and the format was developed and improved.  At first, the idea of the novelist was to tell the story of the life or an experience of a character--character revelation.  In other words, novels began with the idea of revealing the protagonist.  This was their initial form for a while.  Even later novels in English bear this stamp: Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Vanity Fair, and all.  Many, if not most novels from the early period are all about character revelation and less about plot revelation.

Things began to change slightly in the Victorian Era.  The novelist already had the right idea, although character revelation was the focus, the novel needed plot revelation to build and resolve the storyline.  Novels took the form of the third person, past tense, implying the present (or near past).  Novels moved quickly from a journalistic form to a reporting type form.  They also began to take on the five discrete parts in the development of the plot.  This process was relatively fast because the novel went from about one hundred percent character revelation to a long form of the short story.  The short story form was developed, in English, about five hundred years before the novel.  The idea of the discrete parts of a story were not unusual to the early novelists.  The power of the novel was in the proper writing of these parts--however, the novel was still in development.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Monday, November 17, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 221, Mystery Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

17 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 221, Mystery Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The purpose of a novel is to reveal the protagonist and usually the protagonist's helper, the author needs to place them in circumstance that allows them to reveal themselves.  The means can be conversation, exploration, discovery, other's conversation, confession, accidental discovery.

There are three ways to know truth: the scientific method, the historical-witness method, and logic. The three tests used for all documentary evidence in history are: the bibliographical test, the internal test, and the external test.  Let's see how we can use these tests. 

All novels to one degree or another are mystery novels.  We don't consider them or call them mysteries, and they are not necessarily part of the mystery genre, but consider the classics.  Where is Treasure Island without the hidden treasure, the mystery of the lost hidden treasure, the secret (mystery) of the pirates on board.  What about Robinson Caruso?  The entire novel is spend exploring the mysteries of the island, or The Swiss Family Robinson?  It is an exploration of mystery after mystery that culminates in a great secret girl hidden in boy's clothing climax.  Every novel has mystery within it, and every novel is the revelation of this mystery and the protagonist. 

Here's where I am transitioning.  Before, I was writing about the revelation of the protagonist--this is the entire point of any novel, but with the revelation of the protagonist is also the revelation of the plot and theme.  This revelation comes though the storyline.  The question is how should we reveal the plot and theme in the storyline?  This is a very important question.  The simple answer is through showing, but like the question of character revelation, this is requires a very complex answer.

The best way to approach this is through the eyes of history.  We'll look at the past means of plot and theme revelation.    
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 220, Truth the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

16 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 220, Truth the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The purpose of a novel is to reveal the protagonist and usually the protagonist's helper, the author needs to place them in circumstance that allows them to reveal themselves.  The means can be conversation, exploration, discovery, other's conversation, confession, accidental discovery.

There are three ways to know truth: the scientific method, the historical-witness method, and logic. The three tests used for all documentary evidence in history are: the bibliographical test, the internal test, and the external test.  Let's see how we can use these tests. 

More to the point of proof and truth is what we see in mystery novels.  I assert that every novel should be filled with mystery--the biggest mystery is the revelation of the protagonist.  Even the plot of every novel is filled with mystery--what will happen next.  Our usual conception of a mystery novel is one where a detective (of some sort) investigates a crime (of some sort), and resolves the mystery through evidence and deductive or inductive reasoning.  Here, to a degree, is really the form of every novel--this is a mystery theme.  Most novels are not necessarily "mystery" novels, but every novel includes mystery, and I propose that the greater the mystery, the greater the power of the novel.

For example, Aksinya, I gave you this entire novel, so it is easy for me to use it as an example.  There is no mystery about why Aksinya called the demon in the first place, but there are mysteries throughout the novel.  The obvious question is who really is Aksinya and how did she get her powers.  The second is, what will the demon do, and within this context is how will the demon tempt Aksinya next.  The temptation by the demon is a recurring idea in the novel.  This is an important concept that the novel is built around, but the entertainment value is part of the mystery I'm writing about.  The anticipation of the reader is what this is all about.  In Aksinya, I give clues to each successive temptation--many of them come directly out of the mouth of the demon, but they are so unbelievable, Aksinya can't believe them.  For example, the young man, Ernst, who falls in love with Aksinya--was a setup by the demon.  Aksinya is tempted and takes Ernst's love hook line and sinker, but the mystery is about how the man knew about Aksinya and what it means.  We discover in the theme climax, that the demon set up Ernst as a temptation for Aksinya and Ernst and used Aksinya's lady-in-waiting to seduce Ernst and ruin the potential love and engagement.  All these are mysteries and secrets that are revealed through the plot of the novel.  Although Aksinya is not a classical "mystery" novel, it is full of mystery.  The elements to prove truth are used throughout to give strength to the novel and the mysteries.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 219, Truth the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

15 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 219, Truth the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The purpose of a novel is to reveal the protagonist and usually the protagonist's helper, the author needs to place them in circumstance that allows them to reveal themselves.  The means can be conversation, exploration, discovery, other's conversation, confession, accidental discovery.

There are three ways to know truth: the scientific method, the historical-witness method, and logic. The three tests used for all documentary evidence in history are: the bibliographical test, the internal test, and the external test.  Let's see how we can use these tests. 

The Scarlet Letter is a great example of what I'm talking about because most educated people have read it.  Let's turn to a more modern example, Dandelion Wine.  I've written before that this is likely the best current novel in the English language.  It is an example of a "story-style" novel writer, because it is obvious formed of short stories pieced together with a single theme.  The single theme is the changes in the twentieth century world.  In this novel, we are shown bits and pieces of the past and present and see how they relate to the now and the future.  Bradbury is very careful to keep the novel on a very tense footing that does not let the reader know explicitly the truth from the false.  I'd almost rather say the not truth or the not true.  Bradbury is trying to get something into the world of his writing that is much more powerful than the empirical, but he approaches it with empirical certainty.  For example, the time machine...is an old man who relates his knowledge and impressions of the past, but Bradbury never lets the reader off the hook.  The question is always: what is true.  The answer isn't given.  The truth isn't hidden in the events but in the words and the world. 

The machines give it away.  The happiness machine from Dandelion Wine is a device, but it brings not just happiness--what does it really bring?  The author never fully tells us.  The truth is not as important as the feelings and the family.  The green machine is an electric car.  It represents transportation, but causes its users pain, fear, and suffering.  How wonderful it is to live in an empirical world, surrounded by the spiritual...or not.  Just what is the creature that haunts Greenville?  What kind of truth can be found in an elixir of fresh mountain air that brings respite both physical and spiritual?  Bradbury produces magic without magic and sorcery without sorcery.  The edge between truth and not truth never lets on what is really true or really false.  This is the power of literature.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

Friday, November 14, 2014

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 218, still more the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

14 November 2014, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 218, still more the Point of Proof and Other's Conversation, Methods of Revelation How to Develop Storyline, Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels should be available from any webseller or can be ordered from any brick and mortar bookstore.  Information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.
Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my newest novel, Valeska, is this: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska:
I decided on a white cover style.  You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The purpose of a novel is to reveal the protagonist and usually the protagonist's helper, the author needs to place them in circumstance that allows them to reveal themselves.  The means can be conversation, exploration, discovery, other's conversation, confession, accidental discovery.

There are three ways to know truth: the scientific method, the historical-witness method, and logic. The three tests used for all documentary evidence in history are: the bibliographical test, the internal test, and the external test.  Let's see how we can use these tests. 

Let's look back at the first principles of what I've been writing about.  The first principle is that a novel is always the revelation of a protagonist and sometimes a protagonist's helper.  In the past, authors use omniscient voice or a God-like narration to reveal the basics of the protagonist, then they used showing methods.  In a modern novel, the author should only use showing methods to reveal the characters.  I mentioned the methods above as means of revelation and gave examples of how to use them.  One very critical aspect I wrote about was truth in a novel.  My point was to describe the tools that could be used to know truth and the tools to convey truth in your novels.  Those are the methods mentioned above. 

As a pivot, let's discuss again, the use of truth in a novel.  I have written before about secrets.  No novel is any good without secrets.  The major secret is the unrevealed part of the protagonist.  The other great secret is the plot itself.  The author teases these secrets to the forefront in a novel.  The trick is to enable the reader to know what is truth and what is false at the proper time in the novel.

Let's look at an example.  The Scarlet Letter is a novel that everyone should have read--if you haven't, get reading.  In this novel, the protagonist, Hester Prinn has a great secret.  It was a secret that confinement, punishment, interrogation, and shaming could not make her reveal.  It was the name of her lover--the man who fathered her child.  The author keeps this secret to the last.  The novel is a mystery as well as a tragic tale of honor and dishonor.  Throughout the novel, the author gives hints and drops crumbs for the reader.  An astute reader might figure out the secret on his own--or not.  The point is that the author is playing a game.  For the characters in the novel, it is a deadly game that means the end of their lives, professions, and peace.  It means the same for the community.  The author keeps this secret and lets it build until the conclusion when the lover confesses. 

What is important to note is the use of "truth" and falsehood by the author to build the suspense in the novel to its bitter end.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com