My Favorites

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 474, more Characteristics Character Presentation Q and A

28 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 474, more Characteristics Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

An author develops a character first and then reveals the character through the plot.  Plot revelation is what it is all about.  We do not reveal characters by telling.  First develop, then reveal.

Appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, and actions are means of character revelation.  I really like this list--let's look at each piece.

First appearance.  Appearance is the point and end of description.  It is also useful for tags and identification.  I've written about this before, but not for a long while.  Major characters are pretty easy to tag and identify.  Usually, since they are the focus of the writing, the readers won't get them mixed up, but...I still advocate handling them as forcefully as major and minor characters. 

This is what I mean.  Introduce a protagonist, antagonist, or protagonist's helper with at least 300 words of description--this is appearance only.  Only appearance is allowed in the description.  Introduce the name of the character in the description or conversation.  Ensure that you provide tags and ids when you have the character speak and interact--especially at first, but I advise you to use them though out the novel.  Tags and ids allow the reader to picture the character again.  For example, if you describe the protagonist as having black hair and green eyes.  A tag is: she moved her black hair to the side or she pulled back her black hair.  An id might be, Essie squinted her green eyes.  The point is to remind the reader about the character's appearance so they will repicture the character when they read your book.  I think this is a critical characteristic of a novel and of any fiction writing.  This prevents the reader from being confused about characters.  There is much more to this.
         
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Monday, July 27, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 473, Characteristics Character Presentation Q and A

27 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 473, Characteristics Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

An author develops a character first and then reveals the character through the plot.  Plot revelation is what it is all about.  We do not reveal characters by telling.  First develop, then reveal.

Appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, and actions are means of character revelation.  To me, they are also tags or provide tags and provide identifiers for your character.  Appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, and actions are the way you show the character--they are the outward signs of the inward creation.  Let's look at each in some depth. 

About appearance, this is mainly description.  We developed the description for the character and presented the description at the character introduction.  Remember to use about 300 words for a major character and 100 words for a minor character.  You can throw in simple tags such as: she batted her deep green eyes or she flipped her soli black hair etc.  I also like to give my readers a second description through another character's eyes about halfway through the novel--especially for novels of about 100,000 words. 

Appearance is one of the most important characteristics of any character.  I am always disappointed when an author doesn't provide a good description or when the subsequent revelation shows that the writer doesn't have a good picture of his own character.  In a stage play, you never lack for the description of the characters--they are right in front of you.  In a novel (or short story) the same should be true. 
          
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 472, Revelation Character Presentation Q and A

26 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 472, Revelation Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

An author develops a character first and then reveals the character through the plot.  Plot revelation is what it is all about.  We do not reveal characters by telling.  First develop, then reveal.

There is much more to Essie and Mrs. Lyons than I told you here.  In fact, there is a whole novel's worth of revelation about Essie and Mrs. Lyons--that's the point of writing a novel and what it means to reveal a character.  The development just outlines the person for the author, the novel itself brings the character to life, and that is the entire point of character revelation.    

Once an author has developed a character, the author can begin revelation.  Remember, we don't tell--we only show.  You can begin character revelation with description.  Only describe what the reader can see--nothing else.  Then use conversation to introduce the character.  You can also introduce the character with description.  Here is an example of a protagonist introduction at the beginning of a novel.  This is from Warrior of Darkness a yet unpublished novel.

Rain sizzled across the broken concrete.  The black skies drained dark cold drops and sprinkled frozen bits of ice.  They touched Klava Diakonov’s skin and numbed her cheeks and fingers.  A blast of lightning cascaded across the heavens.  She could not see it with her eyes.  Still, she wrapped her black scarf more tightly over her face and pulled her dirty black coat closer.  In spite of that, the blaze of light touched her senses and blinded them for a moment.

The lightning outlined and illuminated her.  She stood across from The Bishop’s Cross Pub in the grass at the base of a knoll.  She was a slight woman with very black hair and dark skin.  Her complexion was uniformly the color of coffee au lait.  It was much darker than the Irish norm of Belfast.  Her eyes were emerald and as deep as two still pools of water.  They appeared almost Egyptian, or at least, like a tomb painting from that cursed British Museum.  Klava was dressed entirely in black.  And in her hand she held a small tablet of black metal that was covered with hieroglyphics and the depiction of a face.  The face was hers and the tablet was hers. 

Regardless of the downpour, Klava lifted up her cold wet hands.  Water dripped down her sleeves and further chilled her.  Her features tensed in concentration and strange words that were neither Irish Gaelic nor English escaped her lips. 

Whatever your notes and development, the revelation of the character turns all that into a three dimensional being.  That real being is what the novel is about, and that real being is what the author wants to show the world.  After all, a novel is always about the revelation of a protagonist and usually a protagonist's helper.
           
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 471, still Developing Character Presentation Q and A

25 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 471, still Developing Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

An author develops a character first and then reveals the character through the plot.  Plot revelation is what it is all about.  We do not reveal characters by telling.  First develop, then reveal.

Once you've developed your character's history, name, and description--you have everything you need.  Some might say, what about the inner workings of the character.  I don't worry about those at all.  I see them as natural adjuncts to the history of the character.  In other words, a character has a character because of their history.  It can be as simple as this--your character went to Oxford University, therefore, they speak with an Oxford accent (plus whatever negatives or positives you want to derive from going to Oxford). 

Characters are simply based on their history, and I mean all their history.  Further, the way I develop a character is from their thinking first and build their history based on that.  So, for Essie, I knew Essie would be a strange person.  She is first a shape-shifter.  She is slow.  She isn't pretty.  Based on being a shape-shifter, her personality changes as well as her shape.  She is quiet, but always listening.  As a human, she is very shy and reticent.  As a wildcat, she is powerful and dangerous.  She was abused and caged for most of her life (whatever her life is or was). Or at least caged and abused for as long as she can remember.

I know Essie because I know her history and who she is.  I developed her before I began writing about her.  In writing about Essie, I never tell the reader about her.  I only show Essie to the reader.  I don't give the reader a history lesson about Essie--her life spills out of the pages as a revelation.  For example, Essie never told anyone that she was abused or caged.  Morfran, Essie's keeper told Mrs. Lyons that he kept Essie in a cage and that before that, the fae held her in a cage.  Mrs. Lyons learned that Essie was abused when she saw Morfran's boys beating her to prevent her from changing.  This is a wonderful scene, but the way.  A scene where Morfran is trying to recapture Essie, and his boys are beating Essie to prevent her from shape-shifting.  At the same time, Mrs. Lyons gets her pistol and tries to save Essie.  Cool stuff--that is character revelation.    
          
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Friday, July 24, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 470, more Developing Character Presentation Q and A

24 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 470, more Developing Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

An author develops a character first and then reveals the character through the plot.  Plot revelation is what it is all about.  We do not reveal characters by telling.  First develop, then reveal.

The question is how t develop and how much to develop.  My character development usually starts with the overall character.  For example, I knew Mrs. Lyons would be a perky elderly lady--she was always a perky young woman.  I knew she would be cagey but slow about some things.  She is slow in giving foresight to her thoughts, but she is very smart and puts certain things together very well.  She is a classic form of a certain type of Victorian female character.  Usually, this is the female sidekick character--read the Bronte sisters for examples.  I put her as the protagonist.  I knew her history, but at this point, the author should jot down or at least think through the history of such a major character.  When was she born?  Who bore her?  How did she grow up?  What was her schooling?  What is her favorite color?  Who did she marry?  Who was her first love?  What is her name?  What is the name of her husband, sons, daughters, father, mother, siblings, and any other important relations or friends?  If you can answer these questions, you are beginning to develop a character.

Next, what does she look like?  I like odd looking and acting characters.  For acting, see above and below.  For looking, Mrs. Lyons is a normal type character, but she has an interesting appearance that allows me to build tags and identification for her:

Matilda Anne Robina Acland Hastings Lyons (1910)

Matilda Anne Robina Acland Hastings Lyons was their old friend.  She was a thin athletic looking woman with a round face.  She was the daughter of Lord and Lady Hastings.  When her parents died Marie and George would attain those hereditary positions.  In consequence, Tilly loved Marie like a daughter and treated all of Leora’s children like her own.  Matilda Anne Robina Acland Hastings Lyons turned around from her desk in her sitting room.  She was a thin and athletic woman with a round face and gentle eyes.  She could not keep from moving all the time.

Her clothing was immaculate, woolen, and very modern—a suit-like skirt and a coat that covered a frilly white shirt.  Her face was round, but not plump, and ringed with short light brown hair.  She was not tall, but her figure was sleek and almost athletic.

She was dressed informally, as Leora noted disdainfully, the British seemed to do with regularity.  Her face was round, but not plump, and ringed with short light brown hair.  Under her long woolen coat, her figure was sleek and almost athletic.  She wore some makeup, but nothing like the women Leora was used to in Paris. 

Some of the description from my novels about Mrs. Lyons.
             
More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 469, Developing Character Presentation Q and A

23 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 469, Developing Character Presentation Q and A

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

Now we are moving into creativity--the development of a character.  First, you need to know this.  Characters are developed by the author before the writing is begun (or at least at some point before they are written about).  Once a character is developed (by the author), then the character is revealed in the plot. 

Character development starts before the novel begins--in every way.  Now, I will give to you that some authors do improve their characters as they write about them, but this is simply part of the power of writing.  In other words, the author develops the character, but as the author writes, the character takes on more reality.  The author then must go back and fix the early writing about the characters to catch up.  In no case should character development occur during the novel.  This statement comes with a caveat, in some novels the protagonist does change slightly (this has been mistakenly called character development by some).  In general, the protagonist must change in a classical novel.  I'm not sure I want to get into this part right away, but let's go. 

In a classical novel (which I advocate all writers attempt), the protagonist must have a telic flaw.  That telic flaw is what causes the theme, plot, and climax and during the climax, the protagonist either overcomes the flaw (comedy) or is overcome by the flaw (tragedy).  The telic flaw is an innate characteristic of the protagonist.  Thus, in Shape, the telic flaw of Essie is that she can change to a wildcat.  The telic flaw of Mrs. Lyons is that she believes she can rehabilitate Essie.  Here comes the $1M question, can the protagonist's helper also have a telic flaw?  Yes, but that flaw shouldn't change.  I think Mrs. Lyons will be the ultimate protagonist, but I'm hedging my bets. 

In Shape, Essie will not stop becoming a wildcat, she will come t grips with being a shape-changer.  Mrs. Lyons will likely have the telic change--she will either be able to rehabilitate Essie or she will not.  The climax will resolve the solution.  Likely, the climax will be between Ceridwen, Essie, and Mrs. Lyons.  Next, more about character development.         

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 468, Character Presentation Q and A Developing the Rising Action

22 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 468, Character Presentation Q and A Developing the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 2.  2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)

Character conflict (tension and release) is the bread and butter of all fiction writing.  That turns to a great question (the second posed)--what about the characters.  You need good characters in conflict or you don't have anything to write about. 

In the classic novel, the protagonist and the antagonist are at odds.  That is the conflict and that is the classical tension.  If you note in early novels (and simple novels), the tension and conflict is between the protagonist and some antagonist.  The more complex and later the novel, the greater the tension between characters becomes until you reach the modern family novel.  Life According to Garp is a novel like this (not necessarily a novel I recommend).  In Garp, the protagonist is beset by ills--the world is literally against him.  In this type of novel, the conflict is between the protagonist and almost everyone else.  Do I need to point out, the protagonist has a psychosis?  This isn't a good type of novel (although popular in the ethical morass of modern literature).  Garp is an exaggeration, but the early (or simple) novel is a simplification.  In a modern complex novel, tension and conflict are not just found between the protagonist and the antagonist.  The protagonist's helper as well as the other major (secondary) characters may be in tension with the protagonist, protagonist's helper, or the antagonist.  This tension comes out of the development of the characters and is part of the revelation of the characters in the plot.    

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 467, indirect Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

21 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 467, indirect Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving back to 1.  1.  Conflict/tension between characters

The tension and release in every novel is almost entirely based in character conflict.  Much of his conflict is subtle and indirect.  Much of it is based in the tension and release cycle driven by the scenes. 

Remember, each scene must have a tension and release.  Generally, in each scene is lessor tension and release cycles.  For example, each time I mention that Essie (from Shape) licks the butter off her bread, that is a subtle tension and release.  The tension is that she does it.  The release is Mrs. Lyons' (or other's) response to it.  For example, if Mrs. Lyons finally became angry at Essie, that would be a direct release.  On the other hand, usually, she just ignores the behavior--that is a more subtle kind of release.  When Claire (seven years old) points out that Essie licks the butter off her bread, that is a direct tension.  Mrs. Lyons disregards the comment--that is an indirect release. 

What is the point?  The point is that through each scene moves the subtle and the direct, direct conflict and tension and indirect tension and conflict.  This is what a scene and the tension development in a scene is all about.  The same is true for the climax and the novel.  The overall idea is to build tension in every scene and in the novel--period.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Monday, July 20, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 466, always Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

20 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 466, always Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving back to 1.  1.  Conflict/tension between characters

Without some degree of conflict between characters, there is usually nothing to write about--end of novel.  Let's just note, you can write a scene with the most subtle of human conflict.  I do this all the time.  I like to write about silent, unstated conflict that smolders just under the surface.  I like even better silent, partially stated conflict that smolders just under the surface and that rears its ugly head every now and then.

Thus in Shape, Essie has some type of unknown conflict with Ceridwen.  This conflict is stated, but it's origin is only hinted at.  The Morfrans say the fae gave Essie into their care in the name of Ceridwen.  Mrs. Lyons knows the real Ceridwen.  She doesn't believe Ceridwen could allow such abuse to Essie.  In Shape, this is an idea that surfaces every scene or so.  Likewise, the idea of the fae becoming involved.  This idea keeps surfacing because the fae (or something) keeps messing up the tea things in the garden.  Essie knows it is the fae.  Somewhat impotent, but the fae have power.

The point of each of these examples is to show that in any novel, the author must keep a balancing act of the conflict development--that is, much of the conflict is subtle and indirect.  Some of the conflict is obvious and direct.  This is part of the power of a novel--the ability to express both to excite and entertain the reader.     

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic 

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 465, more Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

19 July 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 465, more Character Tension Conflict Q and A Developing the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've started writing Shape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:
1.  Scene input (easy)
2.  Scene output (a little harder)
3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)
4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

I can immediately discern three ways to invoke creativity:

1.  History extrapolation
2.  Technological extrapolation
3.  Intellectual extrapolation

Creativity is like an extrapolation of what has been.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I'll use the next few weeks to answer them.

1.  Conflict/tension between characters
2.  Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
3.  Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
4.  Evolving vs static character
5.  Language and style
6.  Verbal, gesture, action
7.  Words employed
8.  Sentence length
9.  Complexity
10.  Type of grammar
11.  Diction
12.  Field of reference or allusion
13.  Tone
14.  Mannerism suggest by speech
15.  Style
16.  Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter's style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov's includes 'apparent' inconclusiveness).

Moving back to 1.  1.  Conflict/tension between characters

To be entertaining every scene of a novel must include tension and release.  In addition, the overall novel must include tension to the climax with an overall release.  This tension is normally in scenes between characters, protagonist and protagonist's helper, and those major characters and the antagonist or secondary characters.  The main point is that the tension in most scenes and in the overall novel is between characters.  This tension can be called conflict, but it is every degree of conflict.  That is, the conflict can be from an unspoken seething to an outright war.  This is an important characteristic of tension.

Tension is conflict, but the conflict is scene and climax driven.  A quick aside, this is a potential key difference between a novel and a biography.  In a biography, the wise author uses tension in every scene to develop entertainment.  In a novel, the author must use tension in every scene to develop entertainment.  As I mentioned, this tension is generally from conflict between characters.

Let's discuss tension (conflict) in a scene.  I am using the example of my latest novel.  At first, Mrs. Lyons and Essie are in direct conflict.  Essie is captive and wants to escape.  Mrs. Lyons uses her cane and force of will to prevent Essie from escaping.  This is real conflict.  When Mrs. Lyons gets Essie to calm down, the conflict becomes much less direct.  Essie wants to eat only meat and protein, Mrs. Lyons doesn't want Essie to lick her butter off her bread.  Essie won't look at anyone or anything--directly.  Do you see the subtle conflict?  This is tension in a scene.     

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:



fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic