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Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 376, Entertainment Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

21 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 376, Entertainment Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Destin, Florida back from the world tour. 

Scene input (easy), scene output (a little harder), scene setting (basic stuff)--now to the hard part.  I hope developing the output and the setting has your creative juices going because the next part is wholly creative.  Now you need to figure out how to make the scene entertaining.  The entertaining is all creative, and it is all about tension and release.  Here is an example from Lilly.

One of my prepublication readers asked a question about some of my writing and characters, and in contemplating the question, I came to a very surprising answer.  The question was about the number of times I happened to have characters get drunk and drink.  Most of my characters are not lushes, but I have one very specific scene in Lilly where two characters get drunk--the reason is purely entertainment.  It also furthers the plot and theme, but let's put it this way--I could have two "goddess" characters who are in a competition with one another have dinner and discuss their circumstances, or I could have them bring their competition to their cups.  Which is more entertaining?  Which is more interesting?  Add to that, the server is a bakaneko (a type of Japanese cat creature who looks like a human) and one of the "goddesses" is Coyote.  Further, Dane is watching it all and is one of the competitive prizes in the slight competition.  Lilly and Tolinka (Coyote) drink too much and are drunk at the end of the evening.  They both try to hide their drunkenness from each other.  The point of their inebriation is not gratuitous--it has a point in the plot and the theme, but it adds entertainment to the scene.  Here's an extract:

Kuro didn’t return to serve tea.  Tolinka’s rice bowl was entirely filled with rice anyway.  Unusually, the beer didn’t run out in the ceramic pitcher canister.  Lilly kept filling up their serving bowls.  After a long while, Tolinka staggered to her feet.  She tried to take a step and achieved one forward and one to the side.

Lilly struggled to her feet.  She swayed a little, “Tolinka, would you like to sleep here?”

Tolinka slowly turned her head toward Lilly, “I am not domesticated, and I certainly don’t like cats.”

“You can sleep in one of the guestrooms.”

Tolinka staggered a step backward.  The wall just caught her, “I don’t like to sleep inside at all.”

“You may sleep on the grounds of the shrine.”

Tolinka hiccupped, “This isn’t the land of my being.  Plus, I’m not feeling too well.”  She burped, “I haven’t felt like this since my last potlatch.”  She burped again.

“Do you need to…you know?”

Tolinka drew herself to her full height, “I don’t…you know.”  She staggered and squirmed a little as she moved against the wall toward the sliding door.  She gave a great smile, “Perhaps your shaman can help me?”

Lilly moved toward Tolinka, then back, “I would, but certainly he can help you.”

Dane stood and Tolinka moved quickly toward him.  She put her arms around him, “Yes, he can help me.  I like your shaman very much.”

Lilly growled, “Don’t get too comfortable around him.”

“Why not—I’d like to share him…”

“Not going to happen,” an angry gong.

Tolinka grasped Dane more tightly, “Just a little sharing.”  She stuck her tongue out at Lilly.

Lilly took a staggering step toward them, “Kannushi, help my friend Tolinka to the torii.  I’ll go with you.”  Lilly stumbled around the table to his other side.  She grasped Dane’s other arm, “Let’s see Tolinka out together.”

Tolinka smiled and held tightly to Dane’s arm.

Dane wasn’t in as bad a shape as the two ladies.  He held them both up—one on either arm.  When they reached the genkan, Kuro was waiting.  She helped Lilly put on her shoes, then Dane.  She hissed at Tolinka.  Tolinka didn’t let go of Dane, but she pulled on her hide boots.  She lifted her lip toward Kuro, but didn’t say anything.  As soon as their shoes were on, Kuro opened the sliding door to the outside.

Lilly gently touched Kuro’s head as she passed, “Thank you, Kuro-san.”

Kuro smiled at Lilly, but completely ignored Tolinka.  Dane acted as the buffer between them.

Both girls wobbled down the path to the stone steps.  At the top of the steps, Tolinka swayed for a moment and Dane put his arm completely around her to keep her from falling.

Lilly gave a gasp, and Dane grabbed her.  He carried them, one under each arm to the bottom of the steps and the torii.  He was lucky both of them were very light.  Tolinka felt like a firm bundle of muscle.  Lilly was soft and slight.  Lilly gave a smug glance at Tolinka.  Tolinka just smiled back at her.

At the torii, Dane set them both on their feet.

Tolinka leaned against Dane, “Are you sure I can’t borrow him?  The night is cold.”

Lilly growled, “I want him for the same reason.”

“You should have more compassion for me.”

“I let you eat my salmon and Dane’s salmon and Kuro’s salmon.”

Tolinka grinned, “Yes, perhaps I overstayed my welcome.”

“You may come back…”

“Any time?”

Lilly lurched forward, “No…no, not at any time.  You may come when we allow you to enter.  You are invited when we invite you.”

Tolinka shrugged, “I would make the same stipulation, but it doesn’t mean I won’t bring some mischief to you or your shaman.”  She raised her face and bright eyes to the skies and slipped through the torii gate.  On the other side, there was a swirl in the darkness and a coyote sat beside the torii.  The coyote’s mouth was open and its tongue lolled to one side.  The coyote paced around in a small circle, lay on the ground outside the torii, and closed its eyes.

Lilly put her arms around Dane’s neck.  She whispered in his ear, “I don’t think I can walk any farther--carry me back to the shamusho.”
Dane picked her up and carried her.  At the top of the stone steps, out of sight of the base of the torii, Lilly struggled in his arms and Dane set her down.  She rushed to the side of the Sandō and fell to her knees.  Dane went to her side.  Lilly lost her dinner, once twice, three times.  She was very quiet about it.  He thought he heard some strange sounds beside the torii gate as well.
   
We'll look more at the concept of creativity in scene development.  The point is very simple, scenes are built to be entertaining.  Entertainment means they excite your readers.  If you imagine an unspoken drinking contest with mutual failure at the end, that gives a degree of entertainment--it also demonstrates the primary means of entertainment development in a scene: tension and release.  The tension is very obvious in the scene.  It is built with the drinking and the banter about Dane.  The release comes at the end--it's a kind of literal "release."  Dane goes home with Lilly--they are committed anyway.  Tolinka knows she can't take Dane away from Lilly, but the tension is excruciating.  For Lilly, who has never been loved before, it is devastating.  The release is sweet--and not so sweet.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Monday, April 20, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 375, Seting Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

20 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 375, Setting Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Wichita Kansas back from the world tour. 

If you have a scene input (have to) and you have a scene output (what you develop to further the plot and theme), then you are ready to write.  Write the scene setting.  Really how hard can that be.  All you have to do is imagine the beginning of the scene in your mind.  I recommend writing a complete scene setting even if it is the same as the last scene (it usually shouldn't be). 

If you happen to have a scene in the same location, the time will be different or something will have changed.  You can describe the morning light or the evening twilight etc.  Writing the setting of the scene and the setting of the characters will begin the creative process, because the next step is envisioning the rest of the scene--we'll get to that.  For now, just set the scene and the characters in the scene. 

When I say set the scene--describe the place, time, lighting, smells, sounds, feel, textures--describe everything the reader can see.  Describe the characters, their clothing, their hair.  Let the reader see the place and the people in the place.  You don't have to go overboard.  100 to 300 words per place and about 300 words per major character, 100 words per minor character are all that is necessary.   Once you have the scene setting, you can move to the next and most difficult step.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 374, more Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

19 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 374, more Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Wichita Kansas back from the world tour. 

Short of turning each scene into a mini-short story, I'm not sure the best way to help design entertainment into a scene.  Here's how I approach scene development.  First, I have the input of the scene from the output of the previous scene.  Next, I develop the output of the scene.

I think the use of scenes is straightforward--they always work for me.  I will admit, in some cases the author has many choices about where to go with a scene.  For example, in the climax for Escape, I could choose to have Reb die, Scott die, they not escape, both die, Scott escape.  I chose for them both to escape, but Reb is critically injured and the reader doesn't know if she will survive--or if they will survive.  I never said writing is easy, but scene development, for me, is easy.  Once I chose they would both escape and Reb would be injured, I just had to develop the scene for tension and release.

So, simply, you know the input for the scene.  You imagine the output of the scene.  Then, you write from here to there using tension and release.  I can make it even easier for you (and me).  Next is scene setting.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 373, Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

18 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 373, Scenes Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Melbourne Australia on another around the world tour. 

Short of turning each scene into a mini-short story, I'm not sure the best way to help design entertainment into a scene.  Here's how I approach scene development.  First, I have the input of the scene from the output of the previous scene.  Next, I develop the output of the scene.

For example, the initial scene of Escape has an output of "Scott goes with Reb."  The input for the next scene is "Scott goes with Reb."  Pretty easy.  Next, where should the second scene end?  I decided the event should be--they go to bed--that is, they go to sleep.  I now need to fill the portion from "Scott goes with Reb" to "They go to sleep" with entertainment.  A part of me asks, how could this not be entertaining?  We are in an entirely new environment that is unlike anywhere in the real or imagined world.  The land of Freedom is a horrible place, and I will show it to you through the eyes of Scott.  The events between "Scott goes with Reb" and "They go to sleep" are filled with: they sneak back into the community.  They bathe (necessary to hide Scott's scent).  They get clothing (necessary to hide Scott).  They eat (necessary to survive).  They go to Reb's room.  They have a conversation about Freedom and escape.

Each of these incidents have their own piece of entertainment and excitement.  For example, the citizens of Freedom bathe and get their clothing issue in the same place.  The bathing is communal.  Reb thinks nothing of it.  Scott is uncomfortable.  Part of cleaning, for Reb, includes decontamination for scent.  They must be nude for it to work, and they need to go into to the device together.  Nudity, in Freedom, is nothing to Reb--for Scott it is uncomfortable.  Likewise, the meals are all synthetic food and drugs.  The drugs are a euphoric with many other properties to help control the Citizens.  Each incident in the scene is exciting and entertaining.  Each part is new to Scott and to the reader.  Each part increases the entertainment of the scene.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Friday, April 17, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 372, still more Developing Tension in the Rising Action

17 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 372, still more Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Melbourne Australia on another around the world tour. 

In each scene, you must develop tension and release.  To be most precise, you must make each scene entertaining to the reader.  This is my specialty.  This is what I strive to accomplish.  Of course, I want to have a cohesive novel where the plot and theme come to a strong climax that is both entertaining and resolves the plot, but give me an entertaining scene.  How about twenty entertaining scenes.  What would you rather read?  Would you rather read a novel that is okay with a fantastic climax or one that entertains you from the first to the last scene?  This is really an important question.  My answer is that I want entertainment.  I want twenty fun filled and entertaining scenes, and I can live with a lackluster climax.  I'll put it to you a little more directly--do you think a novelist who can write twenty strongly entertaining scenes will give you a poor climax?

If you want a great novel, you must make each scene entertaining.  Why stop with the scenes?  Because a scene is the smallest creative increment of any novel.  A novel is composed of scenes.  You can have sentences, paragraphs, etc. without a novel, but you must have scenes to have a novel.  The smallest part of a novel is a scene.  The next point is to make them entertaining.     

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 371, more Developing Tension in the Rising Action

16 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 371, more Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I've just started on the next major run-through of my novel, Escape.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Alice Springs Australia on another around the world tour. 

If you begin writing your scenes as if they are short stories, you will be ready for success in building tension and release into each scene.  You must remember, the purpose of every novel is entertainment, therefore, every scene must be filled with entertainment.  To accomplish this means the development of tension and release in the plot, theme, and in each scene.  I'll leave it to you in the development of the tension and release in the plot (that's the rising action and the climax) and in the theme (usually the rising action and the climax).  Development of tension and release in each scene is almost more important than in the plot and theme.  I've read quite a few novels whose plot and theme were poor, but whose tension and release were excellent.  For example, all those novels that everyone loves the characters and the predicaments they get into, but can't remember the climax or perhaps the theme--like, The Martian Chronicles, Tuff Voyaging, Little Women, Little Men... I suspect I could name many novels like that.  Mainly novels by short story writers who built their short stories into novels, or novelists who were great as tension and release in the scenes, but less so in the plot.

The point is simple, you can write an excellent novel if you know how to use tension and release.      

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release 

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 370, Developing Tension in the Rising Action

15 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 370, Developing Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I'm writing building the rising action of my newest novel, "Escape."  Escape is the working title.  I'll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I'm at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I've written about 380 pages.  I've just started on the next major run-through..

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Broome Australia on another around the world tour. 

How does an author develop tension in the rising action.  The immediate answer is creativity.  The more general answer is that each scene is like a short story.  Each scene is not like a self contained short story, but each scene must be handled as if it is a singular creative part of the novel.  It must fit in the novel, but it must be developed individually as well as part of the novel.

This is a reason that many short story writers eventually become fantastic novelists.  For example, Ray Bradbury and George R. R. Martin are both short story writers who developed their novel writing styles with short stories first and then expanded them into full length novels.  Some of their novels, such as Martin's Tuff Voyaging and Bradbury's Martian Chronicles are short stories pieced into novels.  In fact, you can broadly separate novelists into those who write in a short story style and those who don't.  I build full novel-length ideas in my novels, but if you want to get anywhere in this business, you must train yourself to approach each scene like a short story.

How do you begin a short story?  Usually, with scene setting.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 369, How to Develop Tension in the Rising Action

14 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 369, How to Develop Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I'm writing building the rising action of my newest novel, "Escape."  Escape is the working title.  I'll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I'm at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I've written about 380 pages.  I've just started on the next major run-through..

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Bali on another around the world tour. 

How does an author develop tension in the rising action.  You can ask that question about every part of a novel.  Each scene must build toward the climax, each scene must reveal the plot and theme, and each scene must be filled with tension followed by a release of some type.  A novel is built on scenes.  If you break a novel apart into the scenes it becomes very simple and straightforward to write--as long as you can fill each scene with tension and release.

You might then ask: how do you develop tension in a scene?  And how in every scene?  Since this is a fundamental part of writing, I should try to define and explain this the best I can.  It isn't easy.  We are discussing the creative par of writing.  Creativity does not easily and simply define itself--if that were true, everyone could be Michelangelo.    

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing,

Monday, April 13, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 368, more Tension in the Rising Action

13 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 368, more Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I'm writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, "Escape."  Escape is the working title.  I'll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I'm at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I've written about 380 pages.  I've just started on the next major run-through..

Let's review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don't tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Singapore on another around the world tour. 

All novels and all fiction writing is about tension and release.  To help you develop your novel(s), I advocate the use of scenes as the foundation of the novel.  In fact, if you write normal (as opposed to abby normal) novels, you will always write in scenes.  I wrote in scenes all the time when I wrote my first novel, I just didn't realize it.  As I matured as a writer, while writing about writing, I came to realize the actual method I used to write a novel.  That method is the use of scenes with an input/output from the scene to the next scene.  The previous scene output becomes the input for the next scene.  This is how you begin a scene.

The development of each scene begins with scene setting--you set the scene and you set the characters in the scene.  Next, the author lets the characters loose in the scene.  The action/purpose/meaning of the characters in the scene is always to produce tension and release while progressing the plot and theme.

Let's look back at the purpose of a novel--the only purpose of a novel is to entertain.  No entertain, no readers, no readers, no one buys your novel.  There are likely ten unpublishable great American novels for every published novel that might not be great or American, but it is entertaining.  I write only to entertain.  If you are easy to entertain, you may or may not make a good author.  If you are good at entertaining others, you should make a good author.

Since the purpose of a novel is only to entertain--you must write entertaining scenes.  To write an entertaining scene requires tension and release.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing,

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 367, Tension in the Rising Action

12 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 367, Tension in the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I'm writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, "Escape."  Escape is the working title.  I'll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I'm at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I've written about 380 pages.  I've just started on the next major run-through..

Let's review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don't tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Bangkok on another around the world tour. 

The rising action is all about the development of tension.  The way to accomplish this is through scene development using tension and release.  Every scene should develop tension and release.  The author builds tension through the scene that is released in the scene.  The author can also build tension through or with other scenes that is released later in the rising action.  Ultimately, the author uses the building tension to eventually release it at the climax of the novel. 

Each scene must have a tension and a release.  The entire design of the scene must build tension to a release.  For example, the first scene in Escape.  Reb is going home dreaming of escaping the nation of Freedom.  Scott is illegally overflying the nation of Freedom.  The tension builds as she watches Scott's shuttle, and he has an engine failure.  The tension builds while she runs for cover and he makes an emergency landing.  A each step, the tension builds because, he barely makes the cape and the shuttle almost runs Reb down.  They meet and the tension increases through their conversation.  Reb assumes Scott has come to save her.  Scott isn't sure what to think.  The release comes when Reb convinces Scott to come with her and not wait for the Armed Citizens to capture him.  

Within the context of this first scene, the concept of escape is brought up over and over--this is the tension build for the climax, however, at each point in the scene, the tension builds and builds until the release as Scott decides to go with Reb.

Each scene must build tension and release. 

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing,

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 366, Tension, the Rising Action

11 April 2015, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part 366, Tension, the Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don't show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape--a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.
Cover Proposal
The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I'm writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, "Escape."  Escape is the working title.  I'll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I'm at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I've written about 380 pages.  I've just started on the next major run-through..

Let's review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don't tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel.  I'll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before. 

Short digression:  I'm writing from Calcutta on another around the world tour. 

The rising action is all about the development of tension.  I'll go even further, the tension is the purpose of the rising action.  I teach tension as a part of scene development--how much more is the development of tension in the rising action.  In fact, the result of tension development in the rinsing action is the climax.  I'm out of smash, but I'll continue to discuss the rising action,

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:




fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing,